1. Summer Tomato Sauce - Click on the photo for the recipe

    Summer Tomato Sauce - Click on the photo for the recipe

     

     recipe 

  2. pasta with breadcrumbs - recipe in a poem

    by Elizabeth Zezza, a student learning the English Language

    The wayfarer eats what’s offered him
    in exchange for a tale or a song.
    There’s no food that can harm him,
    since encounters heal
    just like songs do, and tales, too.

    It happened once, around noontime,
    that the wayfarer, invited in,
    was asked to sit
    on a low, white stone wall,
    under the shade of a creeping vine,
    in such a way
    as to behold the sea.
    There he was served “spaghetti”
    topped with dry breadcrumbs,
    and maybe some olives
    and then some figs, perhaps, that’s all,
    as he allowed his gaze to wander on
    towards the far horizon.

    Garlic cloves in a large pan
    frying in oil till golden brown
    then taken out
    and in the fragrant oil,
    dry breadcrumbs frying
    till crisp and gold.
    The cooked pasta is now drained
    and to the sauce added,
    then sprinkled with pepper,
    stirred and served, topped
    with basil leaves, freshly chopped.

    Another time, again at noon,
    a dish of pasta was offered him,
    now with tomato sauce and basil leaves.
    On every dish the cook arranged
    fried egg-plants, cut into stars,
    for he loved beauty, as artists do.

    That’s how the pilgrim feeds,
    accepting all is offered him,
    for nothing can be harmful,
    since encounters heal,
    just like songs do, and tales, too.

    The original image is from this Italian recipe site

     

     poem 

  3. How *not* to drain pasta!

    How *not* to drain pasta!

     

     photo 

  4. La Neva, Enrico Baj, 2002

It’s not pasta but it looks like it!

More Enrico Baj on Escape into Life

    La Neva, Enrico Baj, 2002

    It’s not pasta but it looks like it!

    More Enrico Baj on Escape into Life

     

     collage 

  5. knivesandpompoms:

Francisco Goya

    knivesandpompoms:

    Francisco Goya

     

     painting 

  6. On a balmy midsummer evening

    From Thirteen Ways with Figs, By Michelle, on Peony Moon blog:

    8.

    On a balmy midsummer evening, wrap up your al fresco meal
    at the warped wooden table under the plane tree
    with blistered grilled figs, spoonfuls of soft mascarpone
    drizzled with orange blossom and rose water.
    Smell the mimosa.
    Don’t wipe the sugary smudge from your chin.
    Carry the sated silence to bed.


    The original image is here

     

     photo 

  7. Untitled photo of a Fig Tree - Copyright All rights reserved by S. AL-ahMaD”

Native to the Mediterranean region, the fig tree appears in some images of the Garden of Eden. After eating the forbidden fruit, Adam and Eve covered their nakedness with leaves that are usually said to be from the fig tree, and Islamic tradition mentions two forbidden trees in Eden—a fig tree and an olive tree. In Greek and Roman mythology, figs are sometimes associated with Dionysus (Bacchus to the Romans), god of wine and drunkenness, and with Priapus, a  satyr  who symbolized sexual desire.

The fig tree has a sacred meaning for Buddhists. According to Buddhist legend, the founder of the religion, Siddhartha Gautama or the Buddha, achieved enlightenment one day in 528 B . C . while sitting under a bo tree, a kind of fig tree. The bo or bodhi tree remains a symbol of enlightenment.

Text above from Mythencyclopedia

    Untitled photo of a Fig Tree - Copyright All rights reserved by S. AL-ahMaD”

    Native to the Mediterranean region, the fig tree appears in some images of the Garden of Eden. After eating the forbidden fruit, Adam and Eve covered their nakedness with leaves that are usually said to be from the fig tree, and Islamic tradition mentions two forbidden trees in Eden—a fig tree and an olive tree. In Greek and Roman mythology, figs are sometimes associated with Dionysus (Bacchus to the Romans), god of wine and drunkenness, and with Priapus, a satyr who symbolized sexual desire.

    The fig tree has a sacred meaning for Buddhists. According to Buddhist legend, the founder of the religion, Siddhartha Gautama or the Buddha, achieved enlightenment one day in 528 B . C . while sitting under a bo tree, a kind of fig tree. The bo or bodhi tree remains a symbol of enlightenment.

    Text above from Mythencyclopedia

     

     photo 

  8. Crostini of Balsamic Poached Figs with Two Cheeses - Luscious, quick and easy

Click on the photo for the recipe

    Crostini of Balsamic Poached Figs with Two Cheeses - Luscious, quick and easy

    Click on the photo for the recipe

     

     recipe 

  9. Figs by D.H. Lawrence


    The proper way to eat a fig, in society,
    Is to split it in four, holding it by the stump,
    And open it, so that it is a glittering, rosy, moist, honied, heavy-petalled four-petalled flower.

    Then you throw away the skin
    Which is just like a four-sepalled calyx,
    After you have taken off the blossom, with your lips.

    But the vulgar way
    Is just to put your mouth to the crack, and take out the flesh in one bite.

    Every fruit has its secret.

    The fig is a very secretive fruit.

    ………………………………

    You can read the rest of the poem here.

    The image is from this gardening site

     

     poem 

  10. From Thirteen Ways with Figs, By Michelle, on Peony Moon blog:

9.
Arouse your lover with plump purple figs in a cool bowl of water.
Break the thin moist skin with your fingers.
Close your eyes. Listen to your breathing.

    From Thirteen Ways with Figs, By Michelle, on Peony Moon blog:

    9.

    Arouse your lover with plump purple figs in a cool bowl of water.
    Break the thin moist skin with your fingers.
    Close your eyes. Listen to your breathing.

     

     photo 

  11. Figs, by Mary Fedden, 1972, Tate Collection

    Figs, by Mary Fedden, 1972, Tate Collection

     

     photo 

  12. Aunt’s Tin-Foiled Kitchen, by Jane Tam, via culturehall

    Aunt’s Tin-Foiled Kitchen, by Jane Tam, via culturehall

     

     photo